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Vitamin K2: Bone and Heart Health | PrepareMD

Vitamin K2 – 75% of Americans are deficient in K2.
Keep your bones HARD and your arteries and skin SOFT.

See the web site www.menaQ7.com for more information.

EFFECTS OF HIGHER INGESTION OF VITAMIN K (ROTTERDAM STUDY)

1) Reduction in ALL CAUSE MORTALITY – 26%
2) Reduction in CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE – 57%
3) Reduction in AORTIC CALCIFICATION – 52%

Vitamin K and AGING: Turning to Stone

As we age, calcium  accumulates in soft tissues throughout our bodies.

As we age our ONCE SUPPLE bodies seemingly become stiff and the soft tissues “TURN TO STONE”.

CALCIFICATION of soft tissues, whether skin or arteries, causes HARDENING and STIFFNESS of once elastic tissue.

Many age-related diseases can be linked to calcification including kidney stones, arthritis, cataracts, heart valve insufficiency, bone fractures, wrinkled skin, bone spurs, senility and coronary atherosclerosis. Restoring optimal vitamin K status may help to protect against all of these disorders.

Osteoporosis is a classic age-related disease. A review of 13 randomized controlled human trials that gave adults either vitamin K1 or K2 supplements for at least six months found that except for one, supplemental vitamin K1 or K2 reduced bone mass loss. Vitamin K2 in particular was associated with increased bone mineral density.(Cockayne S, Adamson J, Lanham-New S, et al. Vitamin K and the prevention of fractures: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Arch Intern Med. 2006 Jun 26;166(12):1256-61.)

In all trials to evaluate fracture risk, vitamin K2 was most effective. It reduced the risk of vertebral fractures by 60%, hip fractures by 77%, and all non-vertebral fractures by an astounding 81%.

Higher ingestion of vitamin K results in a 26% reduction in all-cause mortality.

What is Vitamin K2?

Vitamin K is simply one of the 4 “FAT SOLUBLE” vitamins. The FAT SOLUBLE vitamins are: K, A, D, and E (KADE). As you may have heard about vitamin D emerging as an extremely powerful determinant of many phases of health (heart, bone, cancer, mood, skin), ALL THE FAT SOLUBLE VITAMINS ARE PROVING TO BE CRITICAL TO HEALTHY AGING.

There are different FORMS of vitamins.  It is important, when taking supplements, to take the ACTIVE FORMS of the vitamins.  The K2 MK7 form of vitamin K2 is the most active, and safest form.

MenaQ7 has an excellent website, and an excellent K2 MK-7 product. Web site is www.menaq7.com

IMPORTANT QUESTION: Do you know where your calcium is going?

Calcium is supposed to strengthen your bones, but it can settle in your arteries.
KEY: Vitamin K2 helps direct calcium into your bones, and away from arteries.

A hallmark of normal aging involves calcification in soft tissues throughout the body such as heart valves, glands, and blood vessels.

You might (erroneously) think that dietary calcium is the problem causing bad calcification. The opposite is true. When rabbits are fed calcium-deficient diets, calcification rates rise by 2.7-fold. Calcium-supplemented diets, on the other hand, reduce calcification by 62%.

The reason for this contradiction is that in response to a deficit of calcium in the blood, the body excessively robs our bones, and saturates soft tissues with calcium.

As we age, we lose our ability to regulate calcium balance and then suffer the lethal consequences of systemic calcification.

*Vit K2: Emerging as a Superstar for HEART and BONE health.*
IMPORTANT RESEARCH: Vit K2 showed a 50% Reduction in CARDIAC MORTALITY
in people consuming 32 mcg a day (see the Rotterdam Study below).

JUMP TO: The Rotterdam Study – 50% reduction in HEART MORTALITY depending on vitamin K2 daily intake

You must know where your calcium is going. You want your BONES HARD and YOUR ARTERIES SOFT. Calcium HARDENS tissues.

If your calcium is not going into your bones, it may DAMAGE or HARDEN skin, arteries, varicose veins, retina, brain, etc.

Vitamin K2 DIRECTS THE DEPOSITING OF CALCIUM. (SEE THE VIDEOS!) K2 and its ability to determine where calcium will be deposited is a KEY TO AGING WELL.

Think about your skin or veins having calcium deposited into the ELASTIC FRAMEWORK. The skin can become more rigid.

…THE DANCE BETWEEN CALCIUM, VIT D, AND VIT K2 IS CRITICAL…
YOUR CALCIUM IS SILENTLY BEING DEPOSITED – DO YOU KNOW WHERE?
A DEXA bone scan tells you if you have strong bone.
A Heart CT scan tells you if there is calcium in the arteries of your heart.

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K2: Rotterdam Study: 50% Reduction in Cardiac Mortality

4,800 participants, 10 years, INITIALLY HEALTHY > 55 yr olds
Those consuming > 32 mcg of K2 / day had the best outcomes
****50% REDUCTION IN ****CARDIAC MORTALITY****
****25% REDUCTION IN ****ALL-CAUSE MORTALITY****
EXPLANATION: K2 "directs" calcium. Calcium should go into bones, and not into arteries.
EXPLANATION: K2 helps bones calcify and harden and helps arteries de-calcify and soften.
EXPLANATION: the flow of calcium is emerging as a KEY to health

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**How to Stop a Heart Attack** CLICK ON the Video Below: Watch #5 & #6

Source: MenaQ7 www.menaq7.com

VIDEO: Watch K2 Build Bone – Great Animation

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Study #2: For every 10 mcg K2 = 9% REDUCTION in HEART DISEASE. (75% of Americans are deficient)

  • For every 10mcg vitamin K2 (MK-7, MK-8 and MK-9) consumed, the risk of coronary heart disease was reduced by 9%.
  • 16,000 people, population based, 8 years

Vitamin K2 (like vit D) is a determinant of CANCER

1) A  2008 study by the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) also found that increased intake of vitamin K2 may reduce your risk of prostate cancer by 35%LINK

2) 24,000 people, 10 yrs, 1750 cases of cancer, 450 fatal – those who had the highest intakes of vitamin K2 were 14 percent less likely to develop cancer and 28 percent less likely to die of cancer compared to those with the lowest intakes. LINK

3) The Mayo Clinic study noted above found a massive 45% lower risk of Non-Hodgkin lymphoma

4) A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association showed that in those with viral-induced liver cirrhosis, less than 10% of patients given vitamin K2 developed liver cancer. In similar patients not given vitamin K2, a startling 47% developed primary liver cancer. Vitamin K2 decreased the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma to about 20% compared with the control group. (Habu D, Shiomi S, Tamori A, et al. Role of vitamin K2 in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma in women with viral cirrhosis of the liver. JAMA. 2004 Jul 21;292(3):358-61.)

5)  While vitamins K1 and K2 are safe and effective, vitamin K3 is potentially toxic and its use has been limited to treating aggressive cancers. A study published in early 2008 identified several specific mechanisms by which vitamin K3 damages pancreatic cancer cells, leading the researchers to state that, “the action of vitamin K3 may lead to a favorable outcome against pancreatic cancer.”

6) Drugs like Coumadin that antagonize vitamin K do more than cause bone loss and arterial calcification. In a model of melanoma in mice, the oral administration of anticoagulant drugs that antagonize vitamin K “drastically promoted metastasis.” The promotion of metastasis was almost completely suppressed by the pre-administration of vitamin K3.

7) In 2007, scientists identified specific anticancer mechanisms for vitamin K2, including inhibition of proinflammatory nuclear factor-kappa B (NFkB) that is often over-expressed in cancer cells.

Did you know: your bone and arterial health are closely related?

Vitamin K2 (MK-7) has emerged as a major MOVER of CALCIUM. Recent studies have shown a LOWER MORTALITY from both CARDIAC and ALL CAUSES, depending on K2 intake.

LINK: VIDEO – great video showing K2 helping to build bone

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Vitamin K1 and/or K2  studies have suggested these benefits:

  • Increased BMD (bone mineral density) – HARDER BONES
  • Reduced risk of fracture (by improving bone architecture) – BETTER BONE
  • Inhibition of bone resorption (by reducing formation of osteoclasts, the cells that break down bone)
  • Increased peak bone mass during development - THE YOUNGER YOU START, THE BETTER
  • Enhancement of tooth mineralization – HARDER TEETH
  • Prevention and reversal of arterial calcification, stiffness and possibly hypertension - SOFTER, MORE ELASTIC ARTERIES
  • Reduced arterial plaque progression, arterial wall (intima) thickening and lipid peroxidation - LESS AGING AND “RUSTING” OF THE INSIDE OF THE ARTERIES
  • Reduced inflammation (PGE2, COX-2, IL-6) and symptom relief in rheumatoid arthritis – MANY GOOD THINGS HAPPEN WHEN INFLAMMATION AND RUSTING ARE REDUCED
  • Increased apoptosis (death) of cancer cells, as in myeloproliferative diseases including leukemia – PROMISING RESEARCH IN CANCER – CANCER FEEDS OFF INFLAMMATION, RUST (OXIDATION), AND WEAK CELLULAR SYSTEMS
  • Reduced risk of developing hepatocarcinoma arising from Hepatitis C – ORGANS WILL WORK BETTER
  • Brain and nerve myelination support (maintenance of normal lipid sulfatide metabolism) - NERVES ARE VERY SUSCEPTIBLE TO INFLAMMATION AND RUSTING, BECAUSE THEY HAVE HIGH FAT CONTENT
  • Reduced severity of cystic fibrosis (1 mg vitamin K1 was used to compensate for carboxylation defects)
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Low vitamin K can have DEVESTATING CONSEQUENCES – just like low vitamin D:

  • Increased risk of calcification inside arterial walls and heart valves, especially when supplementing with vit D – VITAMIN D INCREASE CALCIUM FLOW – K2 “DIRECTS” THAT CALCIUM TO THE RIGHT PLACE

Vitamin D is of critical importance – it brings calcium into your body.  It must be balanced with the other FAT SOLUBLE vitamins.  K2 is the calcium traffic cop. It DIRECTS the CALCIUM into the bones. You want hard bones and soft arteries, skin, and veins.

  • Deposition in soft tissues, including arteries and VARICOSE VEINS – MAKING SOFT ARTERIES HARD (CALCIUM IS HARD)
  • Increased risk of hypertension (calcification of arterial muscle elastic fibers) – HARD ARTERIES HAVE HIGHER PRESSURES
  • Increased risk of calcification of varicose veins, kidney and muscle, and other soft tissues
  • Increased cartilage calcification, altered cartilage maturation (excessive growth plate mineralization)
  • Contribution to the age-related degeneration of the intervertebral disks (increased calcified/uncalcified cartilage ratio)
  • Increased osteoarthritis disease activity
  • Increased risk of hemorrhage (i.e., excessive menstrual, gum or nose bleeding)
  • Impaired insulin secretion - HIGH INSULIN IS ONE OF THE MAJOR REASONS FOR PREMATURE AGING
  • Increased risk of kidney stone formation
  • Increased skin collagen breakdown (vitamin K dependent proteins are found in dermis and epidermis) – AGING SKIN
  • Suboptimal energy production, 10% reduction in muscle creatine kinase – LESS ENERGY
  • 20% reduction in intestinal mucosa alkaline phosphatase maybe due to structural mitochondrial alteration – THE CELLS CAN’T PRODUCE ENERGY AS WELL

Drug Interactions: K2 Doesn’t React w/ Coumadin like K1

Anticoagulants designed as vitamin K antagonists (such as warfarin / Coumadin) should not be taken with vitamin K .

However, vitamin K does not interfere with the action of blood thinners such as heparin, antiplatelet agents (such as aspirin, Plavix, clopidrogel, abciximab, tirofiban, and eptifibatide), direct thrombin inhibitors (hirudin, argatroban), or thombolytic agents (clot dissolving proteolytic enzymes).

Vitamin K2 has much less interference with Coumadin. Coumadin dosing can be adjusted as long as the vitamin K intake remains consistent.

Drugs like Coumadin that antagonize vitamin K do more than cause bone loss and arterial calcification. In a model of melanoma in mice, the oral administration of anticoagulant drugs that antagonize vitamin K “drastically promoted metastasis.” The promotion of metastasis was almost completely suppressed by the pre-administration of vitamin K3, suggesting that these anticoagulant drugs promote metastasis by specifically antagonizing vitamin K.

Daily and or weekly changes in vitamin K intake make Coumadin dosing more difficult.

Individuals who use Coumadin have long been advised to avoid vitamin K, and as a result, they may suffer increased atherosclerosis and osteoporosis. Under a doctor’s supervision, vitamin K can help stabilize blood indicators of coagulation in Coumadin users while conferring other health benefits.

Anticoagulants that interfere with vitamin K were shown to cause osteoporosis or increase risk of fracture, increase arterial or heart valve calcification  and hypertension.

It is important to note that in addition to their anti-platelet effects, aspirin (acetyl-salicylic acid) and other salicylate-containing drugs, slightly inhibit vitamin K activation and recycling, thus creating an increased demand for vitamin K. Vitamin K supplementation may overcome this effect, while not interfering with their antiplatelet (COX inhibition) action.

Aspirin was shown to increase bone loss and reduce fracture healing, which may be due to its effect on vitamin K metabolism, thus vitamin K supplementation may be warranted whenever aspirin or other salicylate-derived drugs are administered on a long-term basis.

Antibiotics may increase the need for vitamin K supplementation.

Vitamin K and Alzheimer’s Senility

Abstract

The incidence of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) increases with age and in carriers of the apolipoprotein E4 genotype. A relative deficiency of vitamin K, affecting the extrahepatic functions of the vitamin, is common in ageing men and women. The concentration of vitamin K is lower in the circulating blood of APOE4 carriers than in that of persons with other APOE genotypes. Evidence is accumulating that vitamin K has important functions in the brain, including the regulation of sulfotransferase activity and the activity of a growth factor/tyrosine kinase receptor (Gas 6/Axl). The hypothesis is now proposed that vitamin K deficiency contributes to the pathogenesis of AD and that vitamin K supplementation may have a beneficial effect in preventing or treating the disease. Vitamin K may also reduce neuronal damage associated with cardiovascular disease.

Copyright 2001 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

Tests for vitamin K status

Fasting plasma vitamin K1 levels are not a complete indicator of vitamin K status because they only reflect the previous day’s intake. Vitamin K is metabolized at various rates depending on the form; K1 (6-12 hrs), K2 (MK-4) (2-4 hrs) or K2(MK-7) (3-6 days) . Vitamin K is easily metabolized throughout several days and it does not accumulate in the body. Plasma and urine % undercarboxylated osteocalcin is the best functional measure of vitamin K status, but is not yet commercially available.

Source: MenaQ7 http://www.menaq7.com/?page=superiority

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